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Comparative test of Volkswagen Tiguan and Mitsubishi Outlander: buzz or drive?

Which car is preferable – “Japan” or “Europe”? Recently, for obvious reasons, this dilemma does not relate specifically to the Russian motorist. That, and a few more people can afford it now. Nevertheless, when it comes to voting with a wallet, you will be randomly “scratching your hands”. The AvtoVzglyad portal decided to make this task easier by pitting Mitsubishi Outlander and Volkswagen Tiguan against each other.

Comparing a car of European origin with an Asian competitor is difficult and easy at the same time. Everyone knows that the “Germans” steer better, and the “Japanese” are smoother with the lane, and the rest is a matter of taste … In the case of the Volkswagen Tiguan and Mitsubishi Outlander, everything is not as simple as it seems perhaps from the “black and white” point of view.

To start with, in the situation with the Tiguan and Outlander, we are dealing with machines that already have an almost charismatic appearance. The exteriors of both “folks” and “mitsu” of the models we consider change quite conservatively over time and generations. Unlike the same “Koreans”.

In this regard, both crossovers have their own ‘target groups’. And to paint the “Japanophile” the charms of the “chopped” Volkswagen design, and explain to the Tiguan worshiper the fanciful overflows of the Outlander estherier’s “metal” elements is an unpromising pursuit. In principle, crossovers look different: the prim “German” and the more frivolous “Japanese” in this sense are not competitors, but simply different poles in car design.

I must say that the interiors of crossovers also do not overlap stylistically. Salon Mitsubishi Outlander looks distinctly rustic against the background of the “technological” interior of the Volkswagen Tiguan. And in general, frankly, the interior of the “German” is experienced as if it belongs to a car of a higher class. Or a newer generation car. So the Tiguan has an electronic “tidy”, while the Outlander has a lamp switch. The climate control unit for VW is on touch buttons, for Mitsubishi they are all physical “push buttons/turns”. From the point of view of everyday use, this is by no means a minus. But it looks less modern.

But as for the quality of finishing materials, the “Japanese” has no excuses: here he definitely loses to the “German”. The driver’s seat at VW is clearly “sharpened” for the owner-driver: everything becomes clear here already through the pronounced lateral support. The “throne” of the steering Mitsubishi can not boast of special performance in this sense. But behind the ‘wheel’ of the Outlander you feel noticeably freer than in the Tiguan.

With almost the same wheelbase (2670 mm for the “Japanese” and 2678 mm for the “German”), the legs of the rear passengers in the Outlander feel a bit more free. While the luggage space of the European crossover is larger: 615 liters versus 591 for the “Asian”.

Comparison of crossovers on the road only proves the impression created even when meeting the salons. Tiguan on the move only confirms its near reference handling in the class. Perhaps only conditional classmates from the “clip” of premium German brands can surpass him in this parameter.

“German” is “German”: European consumers traditionally prefer more mobile cars. And Asian drivers opt for comfort. Therefore, the Outlander is smoother in motion, in sharp turns at high speed it does not hesitate to roll and does not spoil the driver with a special sharpness of steering feedback. At the same time, you get out on the “Japanese” conditional off-road with a calmer soul: it has a ground clearance of 215 mm, while the “German” has only 190 mm. From the point of view of dynamics on normal asphalt, the VW Tiguan is preferable.

Note that our comparison included a Tiguan with a 150 hp petrol turbo engine and a 6-speed “robot”, as well as an Outlander with a naturally aspirated 146 hp engine and a “variator”. Both cars are four-wheel drive. In the battle for acceleration to 100 km/h, the turbocharged Tiguan clearly beats the competition.

Yes, and the passport data of the models confirms this: the “German” takes 9.8 seconds to accelerate to “hundreds”, and the “Japanese” has more than 11. The difference in curb weight of the crossovers is small , no more than 100 kg, so such a spread in dynamic performance is clearly not caused by the Outlander’s overweight. The point is most likely the high torque that is no longer available at low speeds of the Tiguan turbo engine, as well as the less fuel-efficient, due to the principle of operation, CVT “box” in Outlander.

Somewhere in the same tech jungle lurks a more modest appetite for a crossover from Germany. Due to not the most difficult traffic jams in the city, the engine fuel consumption can be brought to 8.5 liters per 100 kilometers without much effort. With Outlander in exactly the same conditions and with the same driving style, such a trick will not work: less than 10 liters of fuel “per hundred” in the city – well, no way! On the other hand, the “Japanese” can be filled with the cheaper AI-92, while the “German” can be filled with the extremely expensive 95!

The Japanese crossover when purchased will please the wallet of its future owner. Outlander with the above technical characteristics, judging by the official price lists, can be purchased for 3.2-3.6 million rubles, depending on the configuration. Prices for Tiguan are in a higher range: 3.6-4.1 million rubles. The difference is remarkable*. Apparently right now this is exactly the price for better handling, better fuel economy and a more recent design.

* – prices are given without dealer margins.

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Comparing a car of European origin with an Asian competitor is difficult and easy at the same time. Everyone knows that the “Germans” steer better, and the “Japanese” are smoother with the lane, and the rest is a matter of taste … In the case of the Volkswagen Tiguan and Mitsubishi Outlander, everything is not as simple as it seems perhaps from the “black and white” point of view.

To start with, in the situation with the Tiguan and Outlander, we are dealing with machines that already have an almost charismatic appearance. The exteriors of both “folks” and “mitsu” of the models we consider change quite conservatively over time and generations. Unlike the same “Koreans”.

In this regard, both crossovers have their own ‘target groups’. And to paint the “Japanophile” the charms of the “chopped” Volkswagen design, and explain to the Tiguan worshiper the fanciful overflows of the Outlander estherier’s “metal” elements is an unpromising pursuit. In principle, crossovers look different: the prim “German” and the more frivolous “Japanese” in this sense are not competitors, but simply different poles in car design.

I must say that the interiors of crossovers also do not overlap stylistically. Salon Mitsubishi Outlander looks distinctly rustic against the background of the “technological” interior of the Volkswagen Tiguan. And in general, frankly, the interior of the “German” is experienced as if it belongs to a car of a higher class. Or a newer generation car. So the Tiguan has an electronic “tidy”, while the Outlander has a lamp switch. The climate control unit for VW is on touch buttons, for Mitsubishi they are all physical “push buttons/turns”. From the point of view of everyday use, this is by no means a minus. But it looks less modern.

But as for the quality of finishing materials, the “Japanese” has no excuses: here he definitely loses to the “German”. The driver’s seat at VW is clearly “sharpened” for the owner-driver: everything becomes clear here already through the pronounced lateral support. The “throne” of the steering Mitsubishi can not boast of special performance in this sense. But behind the ‘wheel’ of the Outlander you feel noticeably freer than in the Tiguan.

With almost the same wheelbase (2670 mm for the “Japanese” and 2678 mm for the “German”), the legs of the rear passengers in the Outlander feel a bit more free. While the luggage space of the European crossover is larger: 615 liters versus 591 for the “Asian”.

Comparison of crossovers on the road only proves the impression created even when meeting the salons. Tiguan on the move only confirms its near reference handling in the class. Perhaps only conditional classmates from the “clip” of premium German brands can surpass him in this parameter.

“German” is “German”: European consumers traditionally prefer more mobile cars. And Asian drivers opt for comfort. Therefore, the Outlander is smoother in motion, in sharp turns at high speed it does not hesitate to roll and does not spoil the driver with a special sharpness of steering feedback. At the same time, you get out on the “Japanese” conditional off-road with a calmer soul: it has a ground clearance of 215 mm, while the “German” has only 190 mm. From the point of view of dynamics on normal asphalt, the VW Tiguan is preferable.

Note that our comparison included a Tiguan with a 150 hp petrol turbo engine and a 6-speed “robot”, as well as an Outlander with a naturally aspirated 146 hp engine and a “variator”. Both cars are four-wheel drive. In the battle for acceleration to 100 km/h, the turbocharged Tiguan clearly beats the competition.

Yes, and the passport data of the models confirms this: the “German” takes 9.8 seconds to accelerate to “hundreds”, and the “Japanese” has more than 11. The difference in curb weight of the crossovers is small , no more than 100 kg, so such a spread in dynamic performance is clearly not caused by the Outlander’s overweight. The point is most likely the high torque that is no longer available at low speeds of the Tiguan turbo engine, as well as the less fuel-efficient, due to the principle of operation, CVT “box” in Outlander.

Somewhere in the same tech jungle lurks a more modest appetite for a crossover from Germany. Due to not the most difficult traffic jams in the city, the engine fuel consumption can be brought to 8.5 liters per 100 kilometers without much effort. With Outlander in the exact same conditions and with the same driving style, such a trick will not work: less than 10 liters of fuel “per hundred” in the city – well, no way! On the other hand, the “Japanese” can be filled with the cheaper AI-92, while the “German” can be filled with the extremely expensive 95!

The Japanese crossover when purchased will please the wallet of its future owner. Outlander with the above-mentioned technical characteristics, judging by the official price lists, can be purchased for 3.2-3.6 million rubles, depending on the configuration. Prices for Tiguan are in a higher range: 3.6-4.1 million rubles. The difference is remarkable*. Apparently, right now this is exactly the price for better handling, better fuel economy and a more recent design.

* – prices are given without dealer margins.

SUBSCRIBE FOR EXCLUSIVE CONTENT

PORTAL “AUTOVIEW” INTELEGRAM

Source: Avto Vzglyad

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